Category Archives: Archives

Austin Artists: Consider Anomaly Archives as Your Inspiration for the Archives in Art Contest. UPDATE: DEADLINE EXTENDED TO MARCH 31st

UPDATE: DEADLINE EXTENDED TO MARCH 31st

FIND YOUR MUSE AT THE ANOMALY ARCHIVES…

The Anomaly Archives is a Proud Sponsor of the Austin Archives Bazaar and hopes local Austin artists will take advantage of the Bazaar’s new ARCHIVES-IN-ART CONTEST!

AND, we hope our Austin arts community will consider using the Anomaly Archives collections for its inspiration. We’ve got thousands of weird rare paranormal books, magazines, posters, cultural ephemera and more, covering a wealth of topics that might inspire your next art piece. So contact us about visiting the Anomaly Archives to find your muse! Our weekly hours are Thursdays and Saturdays from 2-6pm. Contact us via  phone (512) 842-9046 or EMAIL.

ARCHIVES IN ARTAUSTIN ARCHIVES BAZAAR 2020 JURIED SHOW 

The Austin Archives Bazaar is excited to announce its inaugural exhibition: Archives in Art, a juried art show that encourages Central Texas artists to use or be inspired by archival materials in creating their work. There are no submission fees, and accepted works will be exhibited at the Austin Archives Bazaar on April 19, 2020 and afterwards at Austin Central Library’s 4th Floor from April 27 – June 30. Central Library will be a stop on the WEST Austin Studio Tour in May! There will be cash awards for the jury’s choice and people’s choice winners.

Artists are encouraged to visit a local archival repository in person OR online and select an archival collection or item to interpret as a 2D visual creative work. The artist’s work can pay homage to historical events or figures, fuel discussion, or examine current events through a historical lens. Topics to consider include (but are not limited to): climate change, cultural celebrations, faith, family history, gentrification, human rights, identity, immigration, and incarceration.

Artists may transform and reconfigure copies of archival material, while being mindful of Fair Use Copyright Law. Sources used MUST be cited. See copyright.gov/fair-use/more-info.html for more information.” 

 

Visit the Austin Archives Bazaar‘sArchives in Art” webpage for more information about the Cash Awards, Jurors, Entry Deadlines, Entry Form, and MORE!

Check out this other important information from their webpage:

ABOUT AUSTIN ARCHIVES BAZAAR

Austin Archives Bazaar is a FREE biennial event organized by the Archivists of Central Texas since 2014. Austin Archives Bazaar 2020 will take place at Trinity Hall, 311 E. 5th Street, on April 19, 2020. Visitors will have the opportunity to chat with over 20 local archival repositories who table at the event, hear speakers share stories about their discoveries with archives, learn best preservation practices, win door prizes, and more!

THINGS TO KNOW BEFORE VISITING AN ARCHIVAL REPOSITORY

  1.       For most repositories, a list of their policies and procedures will be available online in some form. Spend time looking over the archives’ website before your visit. Look for a “Plan Your Visit” link which will prepare you for what to expect, including registration steps and what items are prohibited from the reading room. Many archives have locker systems available to store items, but it’s not a bad idea to travel light.
  2.       Be mindful of photography restrictions. Many archives allow the use of cameras, laptops and other personal digital devices, but restrictions may exist.
  3.       Handle all materials carefully and keep the materials in order.
  4.       Be prepared to pay for photocopies.
  5.       Once you find materials to work with, talk to an archivist about how you will be using the item(s) so they can clarify any restrictions on use or copyright violations.

 

AustinArchivesBazaar.org/art/

Archives in Art

 

Anomaly Archivist’s Report, June 6, 2017

Anomaly Archivist’s Report, June 2017

Files: (Newly Added or Updated)

Scott Corrales on Bob Girard

 Bob Girard, Scotia, NY - April 19th 1987. Photo Credit: Clas Svahn / AFU.
Bob Girard, Scotia, NY – April 19th 1987. Photo Credit: Clas Svahn / AFU.

Scott Corrales on Bob Girard

scott-corralesi-inexplicata
Scott Corrales – Inexplicata – The Journal of Hispanic Ufology

It was hard to miss the ads for Arcturus Books in the early days, when I took my first steps into the pool of ufology. Overwhelmed with information as I was, I never thought to contact them or get a copy of their catalogue: magazines, ‘zines, newsletters and bulletin board postings (remember the long-gone days of BBS?) provided a dizzying mix of information where abduction claims, tales of underground bases and straight-out conspiracy theory shared the cramped pages like passengers on a subway train during rush hour.

arcturus-1989-7-julyIt was much later that Joan Jeffers – a devoted Pennsylvanian researcher of UFO and related phenomena – told me to get a hold of Bob Girard, saying he could find any book or periodical I might remember from the early days of sauceriana, or even material from other countries. Oddly enough, I was sort of in touch with Bob already. His former partner, the late Ron Bonds, had set up Illuminet Press expressing an interest in publishing my translation of Salvador Freixedo’s “Visionaries, mystics and contactees”, a great introduction to the Spanish Jesuit’s vast body of work on the paranormal. Bob’s wife Monica provided the cover art for the project, so when I picked up the phone to call Arcturus, no introduction was really necessary.

bob_girard21

Photo of Bob Girard – Credit: Clas Svahn / AFU

I spoke for hours with Bob that first time. What I’d been told was true – he knew all the corners, light and dark, of the paranormal community, current and past – and an encyclopedic recollection of old books. We spoke at length about his own work, “Futureman”, a dystopic view on the ultimate fate of humankind if the age of abductions proved true. Disturbing reading, but written in a most insightful style.

futureman-girardSo it was that Bob helped me rebuild my collection of UFO books, which had been lost over the course of years, some lost over the course of international moves and others forsaken as new interests commanded my attention. Getting into “new” materials was never difficult thanks to Bob’s reviews, which made the Arcturus Books catalogue a joy to read – probably more so than a number of newsstand offerings available at the moment! Some descriptions are etched in my mind, like an old samizdat whose cover “depicted a hayseed peeing into a pond with a flying saucer hovering overhead” – I’m paraphrasing here, but I still smile at the laughter the description caused in me at the time.

Some reviews were at the other end of the spectrum: scathing indictments of the subject matter and sometimes the author. Words that could either make you want to order the book to see if such an assessment was warranted, or enough to make one turn the page and hope for better.

arcturus-1995-a1993 saw the birth of my first newsletter on “UFOs in Latin America and Spain” and Bob Girard was pleased to add it to Arcturus’s offerings, cautioning me not to charge too much for it, since “mystics never have any money”. The price point must’ve been right, as SAMIZDAT (as it was called) became a strong seller for Arcturus over a time frame of five years. When I announced that I the little newsletter was folding (its news stories rendered stale by the Internet), I told him I intended to come back with a new idea. “Whatever you do, make sure it’s good!” he said, and INEXPLICATA came out within months, available in print format for many years before the same situation – the immediacy offered by electronic sources – forced it to migrate to the web, where it has remained since 2003.

scott-corrales-chupacabras-diaries-19960001We didn’t see eye to eye on everything, though. The Chupacabras Diaries, my initial offering on Puerto Rico’s paranormal predator, didn’t really meet his approval. Bob thought the correct approach to take should have been a dismissive one. He particularly disliked a chapter bearing the title “It’s In the Trees- It’s Coming!” – a homage to Jacques Torneur’s The Night of the Demon (1957). Now you’re part of the problem, I believe he said. However, he gladly accepted my self-published copies of TCD and sold them through Arcturus to a world that was only just starting to hear about the creature’s exploits, way before it became a media phenomenon.

When people ask me where I obtained my knowledge of book publishing, having never worked in the industry, I always say it was thanks to those long telephone sessions with Bob Girard. The ins and outs of the publishing world were as familiar to him as the dark corridors of the paranormal. A good and knowledgeable friend who richly deserves to be remembered as a 20th century Renaissance man.

 

Scott Corrales & Inexplicata – The Journal of Hispanic Ufology

See also: